Volunteer Recruitment – Night Cycling 2014

the-hundreds_state-bicycle_1-002Are you one who is adventurous, don’t usually get lost, love interacting with youths and have a desire to make a different? We invite you to volunteer yourself as part of the planning committee of Night Cycling 2014.

Click here for further details of the roles.

Send in your application form to wadclub@gmail.com. Application closes by 30 Nov 2013.

For further enquiry, you can contact John at 6494 2798 or email to wadclub@gmail.com.

 

 

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Leadership Seminar

Leaders are made rather than born.We are glad to be part of the learning journey of a group of student leaders from Serangoon Secondary. Through the seminar, student leaders learn the importance of resilience, setting goals, evaluation and focus in their leadership journey.

“I enjoyed it and thank you for being around to help us out.” Siti Fatin Nadia

 “It’s a fun program, will recommend it to others.” Karthik

 “The Challenge Game which we had to be resilent and go through the challenge. I enjoyed it the most because we succeeded after many failures and it is a good feeling.” Joven Goh 

We look forward to meeting with you again!

 

 

 

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He may be short, but he’s a cut above the rest

Dylan Tong

No one chooses to be short, but choice — and courage — are involved in joining a sport typically dominated by tall people.

 

At 151 cm, 17-year-old Dylan Tong was the shortest when he joined his secondary school basketball team at Bishan Park Secondary (BPSS). He is also the shortest in his current ITE College Central basketball team, and in Team BPSS which he played with at W.A.D! Games on July 20, 2013.

 

He had played other sports such as soccer and table tennis, but he found basketball to be his favourite, so he joined anyway. He has been playing the sport since the age of 13.

 

“People said I was short (and should not play basketball), but I didn’t care about what other people say about me,” he said. To him, he found that playing basketball was “very fun”, and that was more important than people’s remarks about his height.

 

He believes tall and short players each have their advantages and disadvantages. “Tall guys can be slow, whereas short guys are faster. Short people can also dribble the ball very low, so it’s difficult for others to snatch the ball.”

 

He tries to work on his strengths, being fast and accurate in shooting the ball into the hoop. He also learns from roles models such as Chicago Bulls’ player Nate Robinson who’s among the shortest players in the NBA (National Basketball Association).

 

Dylan said: “He wasn’t very good in his first few seasons, but he is someone who never gives up and will give his best. He became a role model for me because he’s short and yet he could get into the NBA.” Nate Robinson and another player, both 175 cm tall, are currently the shortest players who still actively play for the NBA, which is widely considered to be the premier men’s professional basketball league in the world.

 

To others who may struggle to stand out and be different, his encouragement is this: “Ignore the criticism. Know what your own strengths and weaknesses are. Be even better at your strengths, and work on your weaknesses.”

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Focused on the ball, and focused on his beliefs and convictions

“Some say it’s a sleazy sport, because of the gangs and vulgarities. But I think it’s a gentleman sport because there’s no physical contact,” said pool and snooker player Brandon Leow, who was gentlemanly enough to take the initiative in shaking hands with this writer before and after the interview. He is part of Team CHR (short for Christchurch), which played at W.A.D! Games on July 20, 2013.

 

Back in his primary school days, he was a more rebellious kid. He bit a teacher’s hand and applied glue on people’s chairs. But life lessons he learnt from his parents and primary school teachers brought about a positive change in him and have continued to stay with him, even when he is exposed to different temptations.

 

At pool saloon, “sometimes people get temperamental and hot-tempered but I try to be patient and avoid conflicts”, he said.

 

The 22-year-old started playing pool and snooker about five years ago, after being influenced by his father who also plays the sport. His parents were supportive when he played for his team in Christchurch Secondary, but his father also reminded him to stay away from people who could be of negative influence. “They are not the sort of people I want to become, so I tell myself to keep away from bad company.”

 

The thought he puts into striking a ball and his focus at the pool table plays out in how he makes other decisions as well.

 

Brandon said: “I think of the consequences. If someone wants to pick a fight, you have two options – either you get into a fight, or you step away. What benefits do I get from getting into a fight? If I want to vent my anger, I can just go home and vent it and yell into a pillow or something.”

 

“Always stand your ground and stay true to yourself,” he said, adding that learning to manage conflicts has also helped him be accommodating and tolerant of fellow national servicemen.

 

Brandon has a diploma in psychology and intends to get a degree in psychology after serving NS. He hopes to become a social worker or counsellor and help youth in society.

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Juggling different responsibilities, she still came out tops

A tchoukball competition overseas. Preliminary examinations. The SYF (Singapore Youth Festival) modern dance competition. More examinations. Another tchoukball competition overseas. Working part-time as a waitress to help pay for all the overseas trips. And then came the N Levels. All in one single year.

 

Yet Adalene Chua still managed to become the top Normal (Technical) course student in the N Levels, in the whole of Singapore. No wonder that she thinks 2011 was a “very busy but memorable year”.

 

The 18-year-old ITE College Central student started playing tchoukball when she was 15, and she initially played the relatively new sport with boys only, all from social work agency Youth Guidance Outreach Services. “I was known as a crybaby but the guys took care for me. But they also played seriously, and that helped to build my character.” Later on, she was helping another girls’ team to play, when she was talent-scouted by the national women’s team captain in 2010.

 

Playing for a national team was not easy at the starting phase. “At that time I cried alot, because I was asked to improve in different aspects. I was quite sensitive to small remarks like that… Sometimes I thought I was not progressing, but others kept saying I was.” Over time, she became more confident, and she remained open to feedback.

 

“Sometimes people outside the court can see the game from a better perspective. If I want to improve, I must also listen to others, even if they were not playing in the court.”

 

Having to prepare for competitions in the arts, sports and academics in 2011, would she be willing to do it all over again if one could turn back time? Yes, she said.

 

“If I study all the way, it’d be quite boring. And when you grow up, you’ll have to juggle different things anyway. So this is a good opportunity to learn how to manage and juggle different stuff.”

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